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What Is An Impacted Tooth?

March 26th, 2018

FOR MOST PEOPLE, baby teeth become loose and adult teeth erupt in their place. For many, those adult teeth don’t come in entirely straight, so orthodontic treatment is necessary to shift them into the ideal position. For some, one or more of these teeth never emerge on their own, even though they developed in the jaw bone. These are impacted teeth.

Why Does Tooth Impaction Happen?

Tooth impaction is often the result of a crowding problem. If the new tooth doesn’t have room to come in, it may remain stuck beneath the gums. A full impaction is when the tooth fails to erupt at all, whereas a partial impaction is when the tooth breaches the gumline but doesn’t grow in completely.

Teeth Lost In The Gums

The most common teeth to become impacted are wisdom teeth. They might be impacted because there isn’t room for them in the jaw, they may be crooked, or they could even be completely sideways, threatening the roots of second molars.

The only other teeth that are commonly impacted are the upper canine teeth. Research shows that if there’s a history of impacted upper canines in your family, you are more likely to have them as well. Most often, only one canine will be impacted, but sometimes both are. Why the upper canines? Normally, they come in after the incisors and the premolars. When those don’t leave enough room between them, the canines have nowhere to go.

Symptoms And Complications Of Impacted Teeth

Some people with an impacted tooth show no symptoms except that the tooth doesn’t erupt. If it’s a canine, the baby tooth may not even loosen on its own! But even without symptoms, canine teeth are critical to a great smile because they provide essential structure and support. They also take on much of the chewing pressure thanks to their longer roots, which protects the surrounding teeth.

Impacted teeth often cause complications and symptoms besides a lopsided smile. Impacted teeth can push into neighboring teeth beneath the gums and cause cavities, infections, gum disease, or nerve damage. Symptoms might include bad breath, pain, tenderness around the jawline, a prolonged headache or jaw ache, swollen gums, swollen lymph nodes, bad taste in mouth, and visible gaps.

Treatment: A Place For Every Tooth

Impaction of a tooth usually can’t be prevented, but the tooth can be removed (in the case of wisdom teeth) or moved into its proper position (in the case of canines) with oral surgery and orthodontic treatment. An impacted tooth is usually discovered through dental x-rays, and then the orthodontist can determine the best course of action to take.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjVnrA2Nmo4

 

Help Us Help You

If you think you might have an impacted canine or wisdom tooth causing you trouble, schedule a consultation with us! We’d be happy to take a look and come up with the best plan to either get that tooth out of the way or into its proper place.

Thanks for being such amazing patients!

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

What Is An Impacted Tooth?

March 22nd, 2018

FOR MOST PEOPLE, baby teeth become loose and adult teeth erupt in their place. For many, those adult teeth don’t come in entirely straight, so orthodontic treatment is necessary to shift them into the ideal position. For some, one or more of these teeth never emerge on their own, even though they developed in the jaw bone. These are impacted teeth.

Why Does Tooth Impaction Happen?
Tooth impaction is often the result of a crowding problem. If the new tooth doesn’t have room to come in, it may remain stuck beneath the gums. A full impaction is when the tooth fails to erupt at all, whereas a partial impaction is when the tooth breaches the gumline but doesn’t grow in completely.

Teeth Lost In The Gums
The most common teeth to become impacted are wisdom teeth. They might be impacted because there isn’t room for them in the jaw, they may be crooked, or they could even be completely sideways, threatening the roots of second molars.

The only other teeth that are commonly impacted are the upper canine teeth. Research shows that if there’s a history of impacted upper canines in your family, you are more likely to have them as well. Most often, only one canine will be impacted, but sometimes both are. Why the upper canines? Normally, they come in after the incisors and the premolars. When those don’t leave enough room between them, the canines have nowhere to go.

Symptoms And Complications Of Impacted Teeth
Some people with an impacted tooth show no symptoms except that the tooth doesn’t erupt. If it’s a canine, the baby tooth may not even loosen on its own! But even without symptoms, canine teeth are critical to a great smile because they provide essential structure and support. They also take on much of the chewing pressure thanks to their longer roots, which protects the surrounding teeth.

Impacted teeth often cause complications and symptoms besides a lopsided smile. Impacted teeth can push into neighboring teeth beneath the gums and cause cavities, infections, gum disease, or nerve damage. Symptoms might include bad breath, pain, tenderness around the jawline, a prolonged headache or jaw ache, swollen gums, swollen lymph nodes, bad taste in mouth, and visible gaps.

Treatment: A Place For Every Tooth
Impaction of a tooth usually can’t be prevented, but the tooth can be removed (in the case of wisdom teeth) or moved into its proper position (in the case of canines) with oral surgery and orthodontic treatment. An impacted tooth is usually discovered through dental x-rays, and then the orthodontist can determine the best course of action to take.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjVnrA2Nmo4

Help Us Help You
If you think you might have an impacted canine or wisdom tooth causing you trouble, schedule a consultation with us! We’d be happy to take a look and come up with the best plan to either get that tooth out of the way or into its proper place.

Thanks for being such amazing patients!

Welcome to Our Blog

May 5th, 2016

Thank you for taking the time to visit our blog. Please check back often for weekly updates on fun and exciting events happening at our office, important and interesting information about our orthodontics and the dental industry, and the latest news about our practice.

Feel free to leave a comment or question for our doctors and staff - we hope this will be a valuable resource for our patients, their families, and friends!

How, exactly, does Invisalign Teen® work?

February 9th, 2016

your teen has wanted to straighten his or her teeth but has been apprehensive about proceeding with treatment due to concerns about walking around in metallic braces, they have a reason to smile. We are proud to offer Invisalign Teen, a popular choice for straightening teeth without the hassle of traditional wires and brackets. Much like Invisalign® for adults, Invisalign Teen is an alternative to metal braces and is unnoticeable when worn. Invisalign Teen moves teeth at a pace that is faster than traditional braces and is not only virtually invisible, removable and comfortable, but is also individually customized for your teenager’s mouth. And, your child will not have to worry about braces getting in the way! Invisalign Teen aligners, which are made from a smooth, lightweight clear plastic material, fit precisely on the teeth and have become a popular treatment at our office because it helps our younger patients achieve a straight, gorgeous smile without anyone noticing. We are well-aware that most teens today lead a busy lifestyle and have extracurricular activities such as athletics, school band or the school newspaper, and sometimes, they tend to lose things, including their retainers or aligners. But with Invisalign Teen, if your child happens to lose an aligner, you can simply let us know as soon as possible and we will have the aligner replaced. Here are a few frequently-asked questions about Invisalign Teen we hear from patients and parents all the time: Q: Is Invisalign Teen appropriate for my child? A: Invisalign Teen treatment is suited for patients who have lost most, if not all, of their baby teeth and have second molars at least partially erupted. We invite you to visit us for a consultation to determine whether your child is a candidate for Invisalign Teen. Q: How long will it take me to complete Invisalign Teen treatment? A: Because everyone has a unique oral anatomy, the length of treatment depends on the severity of each patient’s case and can only be determined by scheduling and coming in for your initial consultation. Q: Does Invisalign Teen really work? A: Absolutely. Much like Invisalign, Invisalign Teen is just as effective at moving teeth as traditional braces. For the treatment to truly work, however, it is critical that your teen wears his or her aligners as instructed, usually every day for between 20 and 22 hours, except for when eating, brushing, flossing, and playing sports. Q: How does Invisalign Teen work? A: Invisalign Teen works much in the same fashion as Invisalign, using a series of clear, removable, custom-made aligners to slowly move your teenager’s teeth into their desired position as 3D imaging technology maps the complete treatment, from start to finish. Each aligner contains The Blue Dot Wear Indicator, which fades when the aligner becomes worn and is ready to be changed, and provides an estimation of wear-time. You wear each aligner for about two weeks, or as recommended during your initial consultation. During this time, the aligners gradually move the teeth until they achieve the desired final position. If you have questions about Invisalign Teen, or would like to find out if your son or daughter is a candidate for orthodontic treatment using Invisalign Teen, please give us a call to learn more or schedule an initial consultation.

AcceleDent AAO ADA Invisalign i-CAT iTero
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